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Caring For A Dog In A Cone

It’s happened again. Henrietta, the Diva Poodle, is in a cone. She’s had to suffer this indignity three times in her life so far:

  1. Anal gland issues (hope you weren’t eating when you read that!)
  2. The second time she’s had to have a wart/papilloma removed

My wonderful vet said this second papilloma didn’t really have to be removed but because it was growing right where her harness sits we decided to have it taken off mainly because I was worried it would cause an issue if we were out walking and it somhentableehow started bleeding. The vet took her from my arms, took her into a backroom and in a few minutes returned her to me with a cone on her head and staples in her shoulder where the growth was removed.

We were sent home with instructions to put an ice pack on in five minute intervals throughout the first day, given pain medication and antibiotics and a caution to not run or jump. Hen and I go back in ten days to have the staples removed. Until then, it’s attempting to not run into walls or walk into open doors because she can’t judge the distance to get through and a lot of bed rest and belly rubs for the Hen.

Here are my non-medical but from living it tips:

  • Remember when you open the door to have a wider berth than usual or your pup will get hit in the cone
  • Going down stairs is an issue because she cannot see below her very well — word to the wise: Carry her
  • Going up the stairs isn’t much easier because the cone gets caught on the steps — word to the wise: Carry her
  • It is difficult to eat dinner from a regular dinner dish with a cone. I have been placing her dinner on a dinner plate so she can reach it rather than trying to fit her cone inside her food bowl.
  • Drinking is difficult. Either the cone won’t fit into the bowl or she comes up with a cone full of water. Solution: Let her drink out of a drinking glass — it fits inside the cone
  • Jumping onto furniture is difficult as well because the cone gets caught on the edge of it. Solution: Pick her up. She isn’t supposed to be jumping anyway because of the staples in her shoulder
  • Take time away from the computer to just pet her and love on her. That is the easiest one of all!
19 replies to this post
  1. For some reason, I keep hear Justin Timberlake and Andy Samberg singing “It’s My Dog In A Cone”, to the tune of their famous “gift” song. LOL!

  2. So sorry to read that Henrietta is in a cone again. We all hate the dreaded cone for our pets. Thank you for sharing the great tips on asking this easier for our pets from your personal experience. We’ve used pie dishes in the past to make eat and drinking easier.

    • I should have added that tip, especially since Henrietta is rarely fewer than two inches from my heels. If I turn quickly it’s a knee-cone collision!

  3. Aw poor girl! Dog’s sometimes have the funniest reaction when you first put cones on them… you have some very nice tips here. Mine had to wear one a long time ago and she did not like it!

  4. Those are good tips. My sister’s dog, Franny, has had a lot of time in a cone due a number of medical issues. Alice usually takes the cone off when Franny eats and goes outside to do her business. Franny is also the type of dog who doesn’t take advantage of that.

    • Beth, I put up a baby gate in my office and took Hen’s cone off of her yesterday. She really doesn’t seem interested in the staples. She was so unhappy when I put the cone back on once we were done work.

  5. I’m sorry to hear that Henrietta is in a cone again! These are great tips. I like the idea of using a glass for water. My kitties love to drink out of glasses ๐Ÿ™‚

  6. Sorry to hear about being in the cone again; it’s never fun but definitely necessary from time to time in the recovery/healing process. It took me awhile to realize how difficult the simplest tasks become (drinking out of a bowl, going through doors) so the first time I had a dog in a cone it was a real learning experience. Great tips – especially the last one about taking time to give some extra love & attention.

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